Saturday, 25 July 2015

The Oldest Trade

There's an excellent science article over at Haaretez (an Israeli science site) for this week. The topic?  Farming.

Some guys were digging around and found some things....did some carbon testing.....and then asked themselves some questions.  In the end, they came to this one brief conclusion over the dig.  They came establish that farming in this one small area of Israel dates back to roughly 23,000 years ago.  This means a group of people were no longer moving around.....they were in settlements and progressing toward some type of stabilized society.  They were growing wheat and barley.....which meant they were baking bread of some type.  Other evidence?  If you grow wheat and barley.....you need a sickle and they found one.  Yep.....the age deal on the sickle.....relates to the 23,000 years.

It's a major story because for years and years.....the science community has stuck to this story of man just having communities and farming.....for 12,000 years.  Now, they've had to go and double the farming claim.

Altogether on this site.....there are a hundred and forty different types of plants involved on this farm operation.  This wasn't a freak accident or small farm operation.  These guys had insight, figured out various crops that would grow, and fine-tuned their operation year after year..

This puts an odd twist on things.  Guys were standing around and living in a productive world for at least 21,000 years before the Roman era.  Twenty thousand of these years were before religion took root.  With the discovery of 140 different items in their fields or gardens.....these weren't just accidental farmers.....they had a trade and craft.  They knew what they were doing.

All of this brings me to this one single observation.  We are a society that tends to focus at best on the past hundred years and anything past that is difficult to grasp or understand.  In this case.....our real human history goes back well over twenty thousand years,and we are only now beginning to reach this idea.


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