Sunday, 6 November 2016

Wise Decision Making

I could probably write a 500-page book on the topic of wise decision making.....but I'll try to limit to just 40 lines.

By the time I got to boot-camp, I had quietly come to the first level of wise decision making and knew the basic concept.  Over the next thirty-odd years.....I came to observe various levels of wise decision making, good decision making, marginal decision making, and incompetent decision making.

Most people are capable of making wise or good decision making.....maybe even seventy-percent of folks.  Having a college education doesn't really mean you make it to this list or not.  I've worked for three or four people.....one with a MBA....who were absolutely incompetent at the decision process.

The poor decision makers?  It always interested me that they'd repeat mistakes over and over, never learning any lessons, and hated to have advice offered to them.  These were people who basically needed to be supervised or given low or marginal tasks to accomplish.

I sat and witnessed one boss who had around $50,000 of funding dumped into his hands and he had to come up with a spending plan or priority list within one weekend.  Never did he ask for suggestions or take any polling with the team.  Six moths later, as this money was spent and things started to happen....it was obvious that his priorities were worthless and without any real pay-back for the office or the members of the team.

It always interested me that people who were on this poor decision side of life....did this at work, at leisure, and at home.  These are also the people who had bad relationships....conducted bad business transactions.....and just simply could not climb out of this pit that they'd fallen into.

I look mostly in this political season at Hillary Clinton.  Going back to Arkansas and the days at the law firm.....you see this trend of bad decision making starting up.  You would think....well....after a dozen screw-ups.....you would learn some lessons.  The only lessons were to hide mistakes or bad decision-making.....more and more.

At this point in the summer of 2008 when she knows that she's got the State Department job.....which includes a million-dollar IT office there in DC, and dozens of IT and security personnel to ensure the job gets done, she unwisely decides to have her own email server.  From that point on, there are dozens upon dozens of mistakes made, and never once is there some lesson or focus to bring her back to wise decision making.  As she walks out of the door in 2012?  The decision making process just continues along the same route.....poor to marginal decisions.

Shock over Wiener having all her message traffic?  Maybe.  But she basically did every unwise decision possible....to enable Wiener to have that chunk of trouble.

There are a thousand things that you can say about decision making and the processes involved.....but in the end, if you don't practice the art and repeat these processes each and every time.....you will simply never climb out of the pit.

Winning the election and going forward over the next four years with wise decision making?  If I were to make a wager.....I'd put down ten-thousand-dollars that the same trend....the same unwise decision making....would all continue "as is".

At some point, we will probably learn that yes, she officially does have Parkinsons and does take medication.  Someone will ask her if the hectic schedule of President makes the condition worse for her, and she will just grin and say no.  It'll be the 5,000 bad decision of her life and probably won't get much notice by the news media.

Punishing people who commit themselves to bad decision making?  I've witnesses various bosses trying to educate or drag bad decision managers onto another level, and punishment just doesn't work.  In the end, if the individual doesn't commit to changing their life or thinking differently.....all you can do is push them into a one-person office and give them as little responsibility as possible.  How you do this to a President.....is beyond me.

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