Sunday, 12 March 2017

Something You Can't Have

For most of my life....I never thought much of health care.  On a handful of occasions as a kid, my dad whipped out his checkbook and wrote a $25 check for a doctor's visit or shot.  At age 18, I was covered by the Air Force medical deal.  After retiring from the Air Force, I have their Tricare program.  So for the most part, I haven't thought much about it.

Back around 2010....I became a government employee and for 3.5 years....had a commercial health insurance policy.  When I went to the doctor....I sat and asked stupid questions....like why this visit costs $65, or why I need this particular drug, which might have cost $40.

I had one idiot hearing specialist who tried to talk me into buying a $6,100 hearing aid.  I eventually figured out a better deal...at only $1,500.  Yeah, it had all the features of the $6,100 deal.

I sat and watched the comical behavior of congressmen, senators and the President in 2009, on the health care act, and seem mostly amused with the behavior of the GOP as they attempt to fix all of this.

So, I've come to this one single prospective.  You can't have affordable, high-quality, four-star healthcare, period.

If you said you wanted decent three-star affordable health care.....well, maybe.  But that's not what you are asking for.

Why? I'll give you six reasons.

1.  You aren't in Denmark, where highway speeds are 55 mph or less.  Go walk into any major city in Denmark and note the lack of business in the emergency room on weekends.  No drug overdoses.  No shootings.  No knife attacks.  There might be one single doctor in the emergency room area, with four or five nurses, and maybe two ambulance crews on call.  Beyond that....they don't have the type of character that you see in urbanized US cities.  You need bulked up hospitals to handle stupidity, for the most part.

2.  Look around Europe for controlling behavior over alcohol and tobacco.  Less cancer and less kidney/liver issues.  In the US?  No one is about to take either item down a notch on usage.

3.  Go and suggest single-payer type programs around with hospitals or medical companies.  They don't like the idea because the government is only going to pay X-amount on such-and-such procedure.  If you tried to make it occur....they'd just go and shut down various operations, and you'd have only one single hospital within two hours of your house that did ALL common medical procedures.  The rest of these would go to twenty-odd procedures and just become some minimum care hospital.  Would you be happy with less options?  No.

4.  Would you want some doctor reviewing your files and saying your hip operation or knee operation can only occur IF you lose 60 pounds?  You'd go ballistic.  Well, the majority of doctors say successful operations can only occur if you fit into a certain frame of health or weight.  They aren't joking.  The same with doctors who suggest that you need to quit smoking for two months before they conduct such-and-such operation.

5.  Plastic surgery and optional stuff?  This is all stuff that you need to pay for out of your own pocket rather than force the general public to cover this.  The people who want to transform themselves into some other 'being'?  It's going to be hard to find an economical program....when you fit this into the deal.

6.  A cut-off point for generic folks who have only a 20-percent chance of surviving ten years more?  No one wants to sign up for that because it's not fair.  But when you talk about $65,000 in care required this year, and $25,000 each year after that point....to keep you going....it adds up.

I think in five to eight years....after we realize that Trump-Care has problems and the Democrats proceed onto the next version of this, then at that point we might have 20-percent of the public finally ask....is it possible to have affordable four-star health care?  They will realize what I've already come to figure out.

In fifteen years....maybe half the population will realize that you can't reach this perfect level of affordable health care.  Then what?

That's a good question.  If we make it through three separate health insurance programs....all deemed a progressing failure by the end....we might come to realize that having DC manage this whole thing is part of the problem.

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